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Little Tokyo
 At A Glance
  • Adopted Date: February 24, 1970
  • Amendments:
    December 17, 1986
    December 20, 1994
    December 7, 1999
    October 31, 2003
    December 19, 2006
  • Project End Date: February 24, 2013


    Site Office Information:
    448 South Hill Street,
    Suite 1200, Los Angeles,
    California 90013. 
    T: 213-922-7800
    F: 213-617-8233.


    Regional Administrator II:
    Jenny Scanlin
    jscanlin@lacity.org

    Regional Administrator I:
    Jay Virata
    jvirata@cra.lacity.org
 \\Commonspot\internet-site\images\bullet1 About the Project Area

On December 7, 1999, the City Council approved Ordinance No. 172949 which extended the time limitation for the Little Tokyo Redevelopment Project Plan, located southeast of the Los Angeles Civic Center, pursuant to Assembly Bill 1342 until February 24, 2010.

The principal thrust of the Little Tokyo Redevelopment Project is to reconstruct and preserve a mixed use, full service community that will continue to serve as the cultural, religious, social and commercial center of the Japanese American community in Southern California.

Conditions at Time of Adoption
Of 138 structures, 33% were classified as rehabilitation questionable and 44% as substandard. Many of the structures exhibited serious defects such as deteriorated masonry walls and inadequate fire safety provisions. Residential buildings were juxtaposed with industrial uses and approximately 650 of the 672 existing residential units were substandard, without heat or private bathroom facilities.

A large percentage of the population (35%) was over 62 years of age and living on fixed incomes. Obsolete street patterns and railroad lines hindered mobility and development; numerous irregularly shaped parcels did not meet established planning and zoning standards for economic development; obsolete and inferior retail space was scattered throughout the area; there were no hotel rooms for visitors; and community, social, health and recreational uses were lacking.